Monthly Archives: November 2012

Stoke Mandeville National Games 1959

The 1959 National Stoke Mandeville Games took place on Friday 12th and Saturday 13th June1. Information regarding these Games is a little sketchy, but it is known that 217 competitors took part2 from thirteen organisations and institutions from around the UK that can currently be confirmed as having participated and which are listed below. The Games cost £299 to put on and raised £38 from the sale of programmes3 giving a net cost of £261.

British Organisations and Institutions

Chaseley Home, Eastbourne, Sussex

Coal Industry Social Welfare Organisation, Derbyshire

Duchess of Gloucester House, Isleworth, Middlesex

Lyme Green Settlement, Macclesfield, Cheshire

National Spinal Injuries Unit, Stoke Mandeville

Stoke Mandeville ‘Old Boys’ living at home

Stoke Mandeville ‘Old Girls’ living at home

National Spinal Injuries Unit, Stoke Mandeville (Ladies’ Team)

Spinal Injuries Unit, Pinderfields Hospital, Wakefield

Spinal Injuries Unit, Lodge Moor, Sheffield

Star and Garter Home, Richmond, Surrey

Thistle Foundation, Edinburgh, Scotland

Ministry of Health Spinal Injuries Unit, Rookwood, Cardiff, Wales

Sports: Archery          Dartchery        Javelin             Shot Putt      Snooker Swimming      Table Tennis    Wheelchair Basketball        Wheelchair Fencing

The snooker took place in the sports unit, near the swimming pool, with all the other events being hosted on the sports field. Table tennis was housed in a large marquee erected specially for the occasion4. It was claimed the holding of a separate British National Games in order to select the British team for the International Games had resulted in an increased keenness and a higher standard of competition amongst the competitors, because they all deemed it such an honour to qualify for the Great Team3. In addition, for the first time ever, a ladies section was included in the field events5.

Prize Winners

Archery

All of the archery competitions at this year’s Games were held on an individual basis with no team awards. This decision did not, apparently, meet with unanimous approval as some of the men had been grouping themselves into teams throughout the year. Part of the reason for this was the hope that the other team members might ‘cover up’ the ‘deficiencies’ of certain of their team members5!

Junior St Nicholas Round

1. Paul Waddingham (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)    514 pts

2. Colin Embers (Stoke Mandeville)                               440 pts

St Nicholas Round

1. C. Hepple (Pinderfields)                                              556 pts

2. Marion Edwards (Stoke Mandeville)                     453 pts

St Nicholas Round Best Gold: Paul Waddingham (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)

Ladies Columbia Round

1. S. Jones (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)                     356 pts

2. D. King (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)                      339 pts

3. J. Cook (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)                      334 pts

Mens Columbia Round

1. G. Bradley (CISWO Derbyshire)                           530 pts

2. F. Gillatt (CISWO Derbyshire)                               482 pts

3. A. Hall (Pinderfields)                                                 464 pts

4. E. Lidster (Rookwood)                                              461 pts

Columbia Round Best Gold: D. King (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)

Ladies Windsor Round

1. A. Irvine (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)                   593 pts

2. K. Comley (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)                410 pts

3. J. Riddell (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)                  274 pts

Mens Windsor Round

1. O. Clarke (Duchess of Gloucester House)           762 pts

2. J. Laird (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)                     752 pts

3. J. Priday (Stoke Mandeville)                                    749 pts

4. J. Ross (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)                      737 pts

Windsor Round Best Gold: A. Ardwinkle

Short Western Round

1. J. Ross (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)                         606 pts

2. Col. Cameron (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)           569 pts

Short Western Round Best Gold: L. Vick

Albion Round

1. O. Clarke (Duchess of Gloucester House)              685 pts

2. J. Priday (Stoke Mandeville)                                       590 pts

Albion Round Best Gold: O. Clarke (Duchess of Gloucester House)

Basketball

Class A (Complete Lesions)

1. Lyme Green (G. Swindlehurst, P. Moran, W. Shiels, J. McBride, R. Foster)

2. Duchess of Gloucester House (G. Todd, Hayes, F. Kanakakis, D. Thompson, J. Hinchcliffe)

Class B (Incomplete Lesions)

1. Lyme Green (G. Swindlehurst, P. Moran, Chadwick, D. Platten, R. Foster)

2. Thistle Foundation (J. Robertson, T. Wann, Grant, Manson, T. Guthrie)

Dartchery

1. Duchess of Gloucester House (O. Clarke, J. Ross)

2. Stoke Mandeville (J. Priday, C. Embers)

Fencing

Men’s Sabre                                                  Ladies Foil

1. R. Everson (Stoke Mandeville)       1. D. Gubbins (Duchess of Gloucester House)

2. P.O. Da Silva (Stoke Mandeville)  2. J. Riddell (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)

Putting the Shot

Men Class A

1. D. Thompson (Duchess of Gloucester House)                   19 ft 8 in

2=. B. Kamara (Duchess of Gloucester House)                      15 ft 4 in

2=. N. Kenyon (Lodge Moor)                                                         15 ft 4 in

Men Class B

1. A.J. Thompson (Stoke Mandeville)                                     24 ft 7.5 in

2. C. Hepple (Pinderfields)                                                            22 ft 9 in

Ladies Class B

1. J. Young (Duchess of Gloucester House)                           10 ft 0 in

2. J. E. Smith (Duchess of Gloucester House)                         7 ft 2 in

Snooker

1. C. Keeton (Lodge Moor)

2. M. Shelton (Lodge Moor)

Swimming

No results can be located at this time for the swimming competition at these Games.

Table Tennis

Singles

Class A:

1. T. Taylor (Chaseley)                       

2. M. Beck (Chaseley)

Class B:

1. D. Phillips (Rookwood)                 

2. M. Cantly (Stoke Mandeville)

Class C:

1. G. Swindlehurst (Lyme Green)     

2. D. Phillips (Rookwood)

Doubles

Class A:

1. T. Taylor, M. Beck (Chaseley)                        

2. F. Cook, R. Howarth (Star & Garter)

Class B:

1. D. Phillips, Hardy (Rookwood)                      

2. C. Groves, E. Essex (Star & Garter)

Class C:

1. G. Swindlehurst, P. Moran (Lyme Green)      

2. M. Reynolds, G. Cockeram (Rookwood)

Throwing the Club

Men Class A

1. D. Thompson (Duchess of Gloucester House)                  

2. D. Pickering (Pinderfields)

Men Class B

1. C. Hepple (Pinderfields)                                                     100 ft 0.5 in

2. R. Scott (Lodge Moor)                                                           93 ft 2 in

Throwing the Javelin

Men Class A                          

1. D. Thompson (Duchess of Gloucester House)                   61 ft 9.5 in

2. B. Kamara (Duchess of Gloucester House)                        43 ft 10 in

Men Class B

1. D. Thompson (Duchess of Gloucester House)                   65 ft 0.5 in     

2. R. Scott (Lodge Moor)                                                                  63 ft 0 in

Ladies Class B

1. J. Young (Duchess of Gloucester House)                           25 ft 4 in

2. J. E. Smith (Duchess of Gloucester House)                        21 ft 9 in

Challenge Cup and Replica for Best Sportsman of the Day 

1=. O. Clarke (Duchess of Gloucester House)

1=. C. Hepple (Pinderfields)

1=. P. Moran (Lyme Green)

1=. G. Swindlehurst (Lyme Green)

Guests of Honour

The guests of honour at this year’s Games were Mr J.C.A. Faure, Chairman of the Paraplegic Sports Endowment Fund, who gave an up-date on the Fund’s progress and Mr F. Weatherhead, President of the Aylesbury Rotary Club, who presented the prizes. As usual the Games ended with a party with music provided by the R.A.E Westcott Band, who had been entertaining the competitors and spectators throughout the two days of competition5.

Sources

1. The Cord, 1959, Stoke Mandeville Calling, Vol. 11(2); p. 24-26.

2. Bucks Herald, 1959, “Paralympics” to Follow Olympics, Friday 19th June; p. 13.

3. Paraplegic Sports Endowment Fund, 1959, Fourth Annual Report and Abstract of Accounts 1958-1959 (IWAS Archives)

4. Star & Garter Magazine, 1959, 1959 British Stoke Mandeville Games, July; p.15-16.

5. Scruton, J., 1959, The National and International 1959 Stoke Mandeville Games, in The Cord, Vol. 11(3/4); p. 7-27.

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Stoke Mandeville Games 1958: ‘Great Britain’ finally makes its debut

The Games of 1958 took place from Thursday 24th to Saturday 26th July1 and attracted around 250 competitors2,3 from twenty nations4 – a much more manageable number in terms of accommodation. The British team was by far the largest with 83 members3, who were selected at the first National Stoke Mandeville Games held at the hospital on Friday 13th and Saturday 14th June5. The next largest team was France with 33. Many of the smaller countries such as Malta, Israel and Finland only had about half a dozen athletes each3. The withdrawal of the World Veteran’s Federation funding may well have played a part in the drop in the number of nations competing as Portugal, Australia and Sweden were all unable to attend for financial reasons1. Nations competing for the first time included Lebanon, Northern Rhodesia, Uruguay and India. However, all these nations were actually represented by single patients based at Stoke Mandeville. Bizarrely, Chandra Rao of India is actually listed as a member of the British team qualifying for these Games6. It is likely that the organisers chose to re-list her as the sole member of the Indian team (she was from Madras) in order to prevent the number of competing nations dropping too far from the previous year’s peak of 24 competing nations. The Games cost £1,126 to put on and the sale of programmes and admission fees raised £210 meaning the Games had a net cost of £9167.

Nations Represented

Austria      Belgium         Finland          France      Germany       Great Britain   India          Israel               Italy               Lebanon  Malta               Netherlands     Northern Rhodesia        Norway        Pakistan         South Africa       Switzerland     Uruguay       USA             Yugoslavia

As well as the addition of Club Throwing to the sports programme archery saw the addition of two new rounds. For the more advanced archers there was the Albion round, which increased the maximum distance shot to 80 yards, with 36 arrows being shot at distances of 80, 60 and 50 yards. For the novice archery, as agreed at the previous year’s technical meeting, the Saint Nicholas Round was added, which involved shooting 48 arrows over 40 and then a further 36 arrows over 30 yards.

Sports: Archery          Club Throw     Dartchery        Javelin      Shot Putt         Snooker Swimming      Table Tennis    Wheelchair Basketball     Wheelchair Fencing

Demonstrations:        Club Swinging                   

In keeping with Dr Guttmann’s continual references to the Olympic Games 1958 saw the introduction of a preliminary activity to the Games similar to that of the torch relay that was first run at the Berlin Olympic Games of 1936. The relay for the Stoke Mandeville Games commenced on the Wednesday at 9am when the Lord Mayor of Manchester read out the message of the Games on the steps of the town hall from a specially prepared scroll. The Lord Mayor then handed the scroll to Leo Halford of the Lyme Green Settlement, who was the first of four ‘runners’ to carry the scroll on it’s way to the Games, either by car or by wheelchair. The scroll was next read out by the Lord Mayor of Sheffield, who then handed it over to Frank Taylor of the Lodge Moor Spinal Unit for carriage to Birmingham. After a similar ceremony in Birmingham the scroll was handed to Tony Potter for carriage to London, where it was read out by the Lord Mayor of London on the steps of the Mansion House. Finally, it was handed to Dick Thompson of the Duchess of Gloucester House for carriage to Stoke Mandeville and the opening ceremony of the Games1. The scroll, composed by Dr Guttmann read:

“The aim of the Stoke Mandeville Games is to unite paralysed men and women from all parts of the world in an international sports movement and your spirit of true sportsmanship today will give hope and inspiration to thousands of paralysed people.

No greater contribution can be made to society by the paralysed than to help, through the medium of sport, to further friendship and understanding amongst nations3

Prize Winners

Archery

Albion Round (36 arrows at 80yds, 60yds, 50yds)

Highest Individual Score

1. Jim Laird (Great Britain) 612pts

2. A. Potter (Great Britain) 611pts

Windsor Round

Team

1. Great Britain           

(Roy Jennings, Jim Laird, M. Sowden, J. Ross)         2563pts

2. Belgium                  

(Von Puymbroeck, Nemegheer, Claus, Dupont)         2095pts

Highest Individual Score: Roy Jennings (Great Britain) 703pts

Best Gold: M. Sowden (Great Britain)

Columbia Round

Winning Team: 

Great Britain (C. Bradley, J. Duggan, F. Hall, Diana Gubbins)    1828pts

Highest Individual Score: J. Duggan (Great Britain) 520pts

Best Gold: C. Bradley (Great Britain)

St Nicholas Round (48 arrows at 40yds, 36 arrows at 30yds)

Highest Individual Score

1. Finck (France) 574pts

2. Sanson (France) & A. Castella (Switzerland) 468pts

Highest Individual Ladies Score

1. Marie Sutton (Great Britain) 389pts

2. E. Payne (Great Britain) 382pts

Best Gold: Finck (France)

Basketball

The fact that all the former spinal unit teams were now combined into two Great Britain teams meant that there were far fewer teams in the basketball competition this year. This allowed for the competition to revert to a league basis whereby every team played every other team. In the incomplete lesion event the USA once more managed to regain the title, apparently without any repeat of the previous year’s problems. In the complete lesion competition, despite losing to the French, the Great Britain team still managed to take the title by virtue of a superior points average8.

Class A – Complete Lesions

1. Great Britain (Swindlehurst, Todd, Platten, Moran, Wann, Gasgoyne, Thompson, Gibson, Foster, MacBride)

2. France (Arpin, Brondeau, Etienne, Reyland, Tamridger)

Class B – Incomplete Lesions

1. USA (Acca, Welgar, Mucci, D’Antonio, Mabee)

2. Netherlands (Van Ommen, Simons, Kruidenier, Jonsen, Hulmeester)

3. France

4. Great Britain (Toman, Cole, Thomas, Chadwick, Guthrie, Grundy, Scott, Frodshaw, Hinchcliffe, Hepple)

Club Throw

Class A

1. Great Britain (Dick Thompson, Frank Gilbertson)

2. Germany (H. Binner, A. Linderman)

Best Individual Throw: D. Thompson (Great Britain)  157ft 5ins

Class B

1. Germany (H. Binner, W. Prossl)

2. Great Britain (Hepple, Russ Scott)

Best Individual Throw: Saul Welgar (USA) 137ft 8ins

Dartchery

1. Great Britain (V. Whitford, C. Bradley, I. Cathcart, J. Coward)

2. Italy (Magrini, Balucci, Zarilli, Ruschione)

Fencing

Winning Team

1. Great Britain (R. Everson, J. Brookes)

2. Italy (Rossi, Ruschione)

Individual Sabre

1. R. Everson (Great Britain)

2. J. Brookes (Great Britain)

Individual Ladies Foil

1. Gertrude MacFarlane (Great Britain)

2. Scutti (Italy)

Javelin Throw

Class A

1. USA (Percy Mabee, G. Carter)

2. Germany (W. Prossl, O. Jacobs)

Best Individual Throw: D. Thompson (Great Britain) 64ft 2.5ins

Class B

1. Great Britain (D. Thompson, R. Scott)

2. Italy (Nicolini, Rossi)

Best Individual Throw: D. Thompson (Great Britain) 66ft 2.5ins

Shot Putt

Class A

1. Germany (W. Prossl, O. Jacob)

2. Malta (C. Markham, A. Testa)

Best Individual Throw: W. Prossl (Germany) 22ft 3ins

Class B

1. Netherlands (D. Kruidenier, S. Ommen)

2. Great Britain (D. Thompson, C. Thomas)

Best Individual Throw: D. Kruidenier (Netherlands) 24ft 1in

Snooker

1. Cliff Keaton (Great Britain)

2. Arthur Poulter (Great Britain)

Swimming

 No full results available. Known results:

Winning Team on points

1= Great Britain & Germany

Junior Boys Challenge Cup: Eskild Hansen (Norway)

Junior Girls Challenge Cup: Chandra Rao (India) and Val Forder (Great Britain)

Table Tennis

Singles

Class A:          

1. Jacobs (Netherlands)                      

2. Taylor (Great Britain)

Class B:          

1. Phillips (Great Britain)        

2. Abeles (Israel)

Class C:          

1. Yap Soen Lie (Netherlands)

2. Swindlehurst (Great Britain)

Doubles

Class A:

1. Taylor & Wilson (Great Britain)   

2. D. Hare (South Africa) & J. Peroni (Uruguay)

Class B:

1. Lustig & Abeles (Israel)                         

2. Zarilli & Balucchi (Italy)

Class C:

1. Swindlehurst & Murrell (Great Britain)

2. Welgar & Foley (USA) 

The International Society for the Care of Cripples Challenge Cup for the Best Team competing at ‘The Games’

1. Great Britain 245pts

2. USA 107pts

Guests of Honour

Guests of Honour for the Games of 1958 included Mr R.M.H. Thompson, Parliamentary Secretary for the Minister of Health, who officially opened the Games; Mr W. Ch. J. M. Van Lanschot, President of the World Veteran’s Federation, who took the salute during the wheel-past of nations and the actor Kenneth More, who presented the prizes4. During his speech Mr More apparently claimed he had happily accepted the invitation to attend for two reasons. Firstly, he had recently portrayed the World War II flying ace Douglas Bader in the film ‘Reach for the Sky’. And, secondly, he had once been standing peacefully on a mountain in Switzerland when someone had skied into him and broken his back, although fortunately without damaging his spinal cord9.

One individual who made a major impact upon everyone competing at the Games was a young German polio victim, Berndt, who hitch-hiked all the way from Berlin to Stoke Mandeville in order to support his team1.

The technical meeting of trainers was once again held on the Sunday morning after the Games in order to discuss various proposals and issues pertinent to the following year’s Games. In the end there were only two major decisions affecting the next year’s Games that were passed:

  1. That the following new classification system, as suggested by the trainers at the meeting, be adopted for the Games of 1959:

Class A – Cervicals to C7 (inc)

Class B – C8 – T6 (inc)

Class C – T7 to T10 (inc) (complete and incomplete lesions)

Class D – T11 to L2 (inc)

Class E – Cauda Equina

  1. That the overall points scoring system for the various competitions to decide the winner of the International Society for the Care of Cripples Challenge Cup for the Best Team competing at ‘The Games’ be scrapped as it had not proved satisfactory. In its place a Pentathlon event would be introduced made up of five of the sports currently on the Games programme1.

Sources 

1. Scruton, J., 1958, The 1958 International Stoke Mandeville Games, in The Cord, Vol. 10(4); p. 12-30.

2. Bucks Free Press, Courage Triumphs Over Handicap, Friday 1st August; p. 1.

3. Bucks Herald, 1958, Stoke Wheelchair Sports, Friday 1st August; p. 5.

4. Bucks Advertiser & Aylesbury News, 1958, Britain Fared Well In The Wheel-Chair Games, Friday 1st August; p. 16.

5. The Cord, 1958, Stoke Mandeville Calling with a preview of the 1958 Stoke Mandeville Games, Vol. 10(2); p. 10-11.

6. The Cord, 1958, Competitors qualifying for the British team for 1958 International Stoke Mandeville Games, Vol. 10(3); p. 30-32.

7. Paraplegic Sports Endowment Fund, 1959, Fourth Annual Report and Abstract of Accounts 1958-1959 (IWAS Archives)

8. Toman, B., 1958, Inside Story, in The Cord, Vol. 10(4); p. 31-33.

9. Star & Garter Magazine, 1958, International Sports 1958, October; p. 16.

Stoke Mandeville Games 1958: (Re)Introduction of a National Games

A number of reports state that the (re)introduction of a national Games, whilst succeeding in making the event more manageable, also helped re-capture a more intimate family feeling for the Games which even Dr Guttmann commented upon in his closing address1. The Games took place on Friday 13th & Saturday 14th June2. Over two hundred competitors took part3 representing teams from eighteen organisations and institutions4, with each hoping that their athletes would be selected for the first official British team to compete in the International Stoke Mandeville Games the following month. The Games cost £107 to put on and raised £62 from the sale of programmes5.

British Organisations and Institutions

Chaseley Home, Eastbourne, Sussex

Team from Cheltenham

Coal Industry Social Welfare Organisation, Derbyshire

Duchess of Gloucester House, Isleworth, Middlesex

Spinal Injuries Unit, General Hospital, Hexham, Northumberland

Lyme Green Settlement, Macclesfield, Cheshire

National Spinal Injuries Unit, Stoke Mandeville

Stoke Mandeville ‘Old Boys’ living at home

Stoke Mandeville ‘Old Girls’ living at home

National Spinal Injuries Unit, Stoke Mandeville (Ladies’ Team)

Spinal Injuries Unit, Pinderfields Hospital, Wakefield

Spinal Injuries Unit, Promenade Hospital, Southport, Lancashire

Spinal Injuries Unit, Lodge Moor, Sheffield

Star and Garter Home, Richmond, Surrey

Spinal Injuries Unit, Edenhall Hospital, Musselburgh, Midlothian, Scotland

Thistle Foundation, Edinburgh, Scotland

Ministry of Health Spinal Injuries Unit, Rookwood, Cardiff, Wales

Winford Orthopaedic Hospital, Winford, Somerset.

Sports: Archery          Dartchery        Javelin             Shot Putt      Snooker Swimming      Table Tennis    Wheelchair Basketball        Wheelchair Fencing

Prize Winners

Archery

Stoke Mandeville Junior Round

Best Individual Score: Judy Cheek (Stoke Mandeville)

Second Best Individual Score: John Park (Lodge Moor)

Third Best Individual Score: Paul Waddingham (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)

Best Gold of the Day: J. Park (Lodge Moor)

St Nicholas Round

Team

1. F. Taylor & J. Merrills (Lodge Moor)

2. E. Lidster & O. Highes (Rookwood)

Best Gold of the Day: F. Taylor (Lodge Moor)

Columbia Round

Team

1. V. Whitford, P. Limb, F. Gillett, C. Bradley (CISWO Derbyshire)  1693 pts

2. S. Hewitson, R. Browne, E. Batchelor, W. Shyzmanski (Hexham)   1380 pts

Best Gold of the Day: W. Freeman (Stoke Mandeville Old Boys “A”)

Ladies Colombia Round

Team

1. R. Irvine, P. Huggins, R. Smyth, D. King (Stoke Mandeville Old Girls “A”) 1189 pts

2. A. Willis-Dixon, B. Everall, Y. French, B. Noon (Stoke Mandeville Old Girls “B”) 1098pts

Windsor Round

Team

1. R. Martin, O. Clarke, M. Sheedy, J. Ross (Duchess of Gloucester House) 2633 pts

2. L. Vick, J. Irvine, R. Jennings, S. Nowak (Stoke Mandeville Old Boys “D”) 2559 pts

Highest Individual Score: R. Jennings (Stoke Mandeville Old Boys “D”) 778 pts

Highest Individual Score in Stoke Mandeville team: M. Sowden                706 pts

Highest Individual Score in Duchess of Gloucester team: J. Ross               752 pts

Best Gold of the Day: H. Kerr (Stoke Mandeville)

Western Round (37 competitors)

(Run as a competition for individuals)

Best Individual Score: A. Potter (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)          689 pts

Second Best Individual Score: J. Doogan (Edenhall)                           628 pts

Third Best Individual Score: R. Harper (Lyme Green)                        618 pts

Best Gold of the Day: J. Doogan (Edenhall)

Basketball

Class A (Complete Lesions)

1. Lyme Green

(Chadwick, Moran, Platten, McBride, Swindlehurst)

2. Duchess of Gloucester House

(Gibson, Thompson, Todd, Hinchcliffe, Kamara)

Class B (Incomplete Lesions)

1. Lyme Green

(Cole, Foster, McBride, Chadwick, Moran)

2. Duchess of Gloucester House

(Toman, Todd, Hinchcliffe, Maxwell, Thompson)

Dartchery

1. CISWO Derbyshire

(C. Bradley, V. Whitford, F. Gillett, P. Limb)

2. Stoke Mandeville Old Boys “C”

(I. Cathcart, J. Coward, N. Wilson, D. Cameron)

Fencing

Individual Sabre

1. R. Everson (Stoke Mandeville)

2. G. Brooks (Stoke Mandeville)

Individual Ladies Foil

1. G. McFarlane (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)

2. J. Brockwell (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)

Putting the Shot

Class A (Lesions above T10)

1. D. Thompson (Duchess of Gloucester House)

2. B. Kamara (Duchess of Gloucester House)

Class B (Lesions below T10)

1. C. Hepple (Pinderfields)

2. R. Scott (Lodge Moor)

3. D. Thompson (Duchess of Gloucester House)

Snooker

1. C. Keeton (Lodge Moor)

2. A. Poulter (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)

Swimming

Junior Girls

Backstroke: 1. Chandra Rao (Stoke Mandeville)

Polio Girls

Crawl: 1. Antoinette Newell (High Wycombe)

Breaststroke: 1. Antoinette Newell (High Wycombe)

Back stroke: 1. Dawn Randall (High Wycombe)

Junior Boys

Crawl: 1. S. Darrington (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)

Breaststroke: 1. D. Price (Winford)

Back stroke: 1. Paul Waddingham (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)

Senior Girls

Back stroke: 1. Daisy Flint (Cheltenham)

Ladies Complete Lesions

Class B

Breaststroke: 1. Janet Laughton (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)

Back stroke: 1. Janet Laughton (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)

Class C

Breaststroke: 1. Nancy Bolam (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)

Back stroke: 1. Anne Masson (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)

Class D

Breaststroke: 1. Monica Hatt (High Wycombe)

Back stroke: 1. Monica Hatt (High Wycombe)

Crawl: 1. Monica Hatt (High Wycombe)

Ladies Incomplete Lesions

Class A

Breaststroke: 1. Barbara Anderson (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)

Back stroke: 1. Barbara Anderson (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)

Class B

Back stroke: 1. Diana King (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)

Class C

Back stroke: 1. Susan Telfer (Stoke Mandeville)

Men Complete Lesions

Class A

Back stroke: 1. A. Miller (Stoke Mandeville)

Class B

Breaststroke: 1. W. Lawton (Southport)

Back stroke: 1. W. H. White (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)

Crawl: 1. K. Brook (Pinderfields)

Class C

Breaststroke: 1. P. Stanton (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)

Back stroke: 1. P. Stanton (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)

Crawl:

1= P. Stanton (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)

1= P. McCranor (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)

Men Incomplete Lesions

Class A

Back stroke: 1. S. Miles (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)

Class B

Back stroke: 1. A. Brindle (Cheltenham)

Class C

Back stroke: 1. A. Diamond (Stoke Mandeville)

Class D

Back stroke: 1. Ian Drury (High Wycombe)

Table Tennis

Singles

Class A

1. T. Taylor (Chaseley)                      

2. F. Cook (Star & Garter)

Class B

1. D. Phillips (Rookwood)                 

2. A. Masson (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)

Class C

1. G. Swindlehurst (Lyme Green)     

2. D. Phillips (Rookwood)

Doubles

Class A

1. A. Wilson, T. Taylor (Chaseley)                      

2. F. Cook, P. Witterick (Star & Garter)

Class B

1. D. Phillips, J. Hardy (Rookwood)    

2. G. Bolton, H. Stewart (Stoke Mandeville)

Class C

1. R. Murrell, G. Swindlehurst (Lyme Green)  

2. W. Toman, J. Gibson (D. of G. House)

Throwing the Club

Class A: No Entries

Class B (Lesions below T10)

1. C. Hepple (Pinderfields)

2. R. Scott (Lodge Moor)

3. D. Thompson (Duchess of Gloucester House)

Throwing the Javelin

Class A (Lesions above T10)

1. D. Thompson (Duchess of Gloucester House)

2. B. Kamara (Duchess of Gloucester House)

3. J. Gasgoigne (Lodge Moor)

Class B (Lesions below T10)

1. D. Thompson (Duchess of Gloucester House)

2. R. Scott (Lodge Moor)

3. C. Thomas (Lodge Moor)

Guests of Honour

The highlight of the Games for many was the visit late on the Friday afternoon of HRH Prince Philip who arrived by car at 4pm accompanied by the Lord Lieutenant of Buckinghamshire, Sir Henry Aubrey-Fletcher, following a day of visits in Aylesbury6. He was only scheduled to stay for thirty minutes1, but so interested was he in the events that, much to the consternation of his Aides, he did not depart until 5.15pm. He took time to watch nearly all the different sports and even stopped at Ward 1X, where several acute cases were housed.

On the Saturday following completion of all the events the honour of presenting the medals and prizes was given to Thomas ‘Q’ Hill who was due to retire the following month following nearly fourteen years of service at Stoke Mandeville as Remedial Gymnast. On completion of his prize giving duties ‘Q’ was presented with a silver tea service and a cheque by Dr Guttmann in grateful thanks of his long service with both the Spinal Unit and the Games. The Games were completed by a Party held in the gym on the Saturday night for all competitors and escorts5.

Competitors Qualifying for the First Ever British Team for the 1958 International Stoke Mandeville Games.

Basketball

Complete Lesions                                          

G. Swindlehurst    Lyme Green (Captain)                      

G. Todd                  Duchess of Gloucester House          

D. Platten              Lyme Green                                         

T. Moran               Lyme Green                                         

T. Wann                 Thistle Foundation                             

Substitutes

D. Thompson       Duchess of Gloucester House          

J. Gibson                Duchess of Gloucester House          

R. Foster                Lyme Green                                         

J. McBride             Lyme Green                                         

J. Gasgoigne          Lodge Moor                                         

Incomplete Lesions

W. Toman             Duchess of Gloucester House

F. Cole                   Lyme Green

C. Thomas            Lodge Moor

J. Chadwick          Lyme Green

T. Guthrie              Thistle Foundation

Substitutes

G. Grundy             Lodge Moor

R. Scott                  Lodge Moor

Frodshaw              Lodge Moor

J. Hincliffe            Duchess of Gloucester House

C. Hepple              Pinderfields

Swimming

Junior Girls                                                                           

D. Flint                   Cheltenham                                         

V. Forder               Stoke Mandeville Old Girl                 

C. Rao                   Stoke Mandeville                                               

D. Randle              High Wycome                                     

Junior Boys

P. Waddingham   Stoke Mandeville Old Boy

D. Price                  Winford Orthopaedic Hospital

S. Darrington        Stoke Mandeville Old Boy

M. Goss                 Stoke Mandeville Old Boy

Ladies                                                                                   

J. Laughton           Stoke Mandeville Old Girl                 

V. Forder               Stoke Mandeville Old Girl                 

B. Anderson          Stoke Mandeville Old Girl                 

D. King                   Stoke Mandeville Old Girl                 

S. Telfer                 Stoke Mandeville                                 

A. Masson             Stoke Mandeville Old Girl                 

M. Hatt                  High  Wycombe                                  

Men

R. Miller                Stoke Mandeville

W. White               Stoke Mandeville Old Boy

P. Stanton             Stoke Mandeville Old Boy

S. Miles                  Stoke Mandeville Old Boy

A. Diamond          Stoke Mandeville

Diver                      Winford Orthopaedic Hospital

Laughton              Southport

L. Drummond      Stoke Mandeville

A. Brindle              Cheltenham

Brook                     Pinderfields

G. Moore               Cheltenham

P. McCranor         Stoke Mandeville Old Boy

Heyes                     Southport

Archery

Windsor Round                                             

R. Jennings            Stoke Mandeville Old Boy                               

J. Ross                    Duchess of Gloucester House          

M. Sowden            Stoke Mandeville                                               

J. Laird                   Stoke Mandeville Old Boy                               

H. Hill                    Stoke Mandeville   (1st Reserve)      

Columbia Round

C. Bradley             CISWO Derbyshire

J. Duggan              Edenhall

F. Hall                    Pinderfields

M. Periscinotti      D. of G. House  (1st Reserve)

Dartchery

V. Whitford                CISWO Derbyshire

C. Bradley                   CISWO Derbyshire

I. Cathcart                   Stoke Mandeville Old Boy

J. Coward                    Stoke Mandeville Old Boy

H. Kerr                        Stoke Mandeville  (1st Reserve)

Throwing the Javelin

Class A                                                           

D. Thompson       Duchess of Gloucester House          

B. Kamara            Duchess of Gloucester House          

J. Gasgoigne          Lodge Moor (1st Reserve)                  

Class B

D. Thompson       Duchess of Gloucester House

R. Scott                  Lodge Moor

C. Thomas            Lodge Moor (1st Reserve)

Throwing the Club

Class B

C. Hepple        Pinderfields

R. Scott           Lodge Moor

D. Thompson  Duchess of Gloucester House (1st Reserve)

Table Tennis

Singles                                       

Class A                        T. Taylor (Chaseley)                  

Reserves          F. Cook (Star & Garter)                         

Class B                        D. Phillips (Rookwood)                         

Reserves          M. Parkin (Lodge Moor)            

Class C                        G. Swindlehurst (Lyme Green)     

Reserves          P. McCranor (S. M. Old Boy)    

Doubles

Class A                        T. Taylor/ A. Wilson (Chaseley)

Reserves          F. Cook/ T. Witterick (Star & Garter)

Class B                        D. Phillips/ J. Hardy (Rookwood)

Reserves          G. Bolton/ H. Stewart (Stoke Mandeville)

Class C                        G. Swindlehurst/ R. Murrell (Lyme Green)

Reserves          J. Gibson/ W. Toman (D. Of G. House)

Fencing

Mens Sabre                                                    

R. Everson       (Stoke Mandeville)                 

G. Brookes      (Stoke Mandeville)                 

D. Winters       (Rookwood) (Reserve)                       

Ladies Foil

G. McFarlane (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)

J. Brockwell (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl)

S. Telfer (Stoke Mandeville) (Reserve)

Snooker

C. Keeton (Lodge Moor)

A. Poulter (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy) (Reserve)

Reserves were not required unless notified

Sources

1. Bucks Herald, 1958, Keen Contest by Paraplegic Athletes, Friday 20th June; p. 2.

2. Star & Garter Magazine, 1958, Stoke Mandeville Games, July; p.16-17.

3. Bucks Advertiser & Aylesbury News, 1958, 200 in National Games at Stoke Mandeville, Friday 20th June; p. 23.

4. Bucks Free Press, 1958, ‘Real Sportsmen’ Are Tribute to Doctor, Friday 20th June; p.9.

5. Paraplegic Sports Endowment Fund, 1959, Fourth Annual Report and Abstract of Accounts 1958-1959 (IWAS Archives)

6. Scruton, J., 1958, The 1958 National Stoke Mandeville Games, in The Cord, Vol. 10(3); p. 6-16.

 

Stoke Mandeville Games 1957: Space is getting tight

Possibly driven by the publicity surrounding the award of the Fearnley Cup the participation in the Games of this year jumped from 280 competitors from 18 nations the previous year to 360 competitors from 24 nations this year1. This increase in competitors also meant that some heats in events such as table tennis had to be held on Thursday 25th July, the same day as the annual Scientific Congress2, followed by two full days of competition ending on Saturday 27th July. Teams competing for the very first time were Argentina, Ireland, Sweden and Switzerland. In addition, teams visiting especially for the Games for the first time, as opposed to being represented by patients based at Stoke Mandeville or other Spinal Units, were Australia, Greece and Malta. This also meant that for the first time ever in the history of the Games all continents of the globe were represented3.

International Nations Represented

Argentina        Australia          Austria        Belgium        Canada           Denmark    Finland            France               Germany     Greece          Ireland            Israel Italy                  Malaysia           Malta            Netherlands   Norway       Pakistan Portugal          South Africa   Sweden         Switzerland    USA

British Organisations and Institutions

Banstead Place, Dorincourt, Leatherhead

Chaseley Home, Eastbourne, Sussex

Team from Cheltenham

Coal Industry Social Welfare Organisation, Derbyshire

Duchess of Gloucester House, Isleworth, Middlesex

Spinal Injuries Unit, GeneralHospital, Hexham, Northumberland

Lyme Green Settlement, Macclesfield, Cheshire

National Spinal Injuries Unit, Stoke Mandeville

Stoke Mandeville ‘Old Boys’ living at home

Stoke Mandeville ‘Old Girls’ living at home

National Spinal Injuries Unit, Stoke Mandeville (Ladies’ Team)

No. 3 PolishHospital, Penley, Denbighshire

Northumberland and Cumberland Paraplegic Mineworkers’ Club

Spinal Injuries Unit, PinderfieldsHospital, Wakefield

Spinal Injuries Unit, PromenadeHospital, Southport, Lancashire

Spinal Injuries Unit, Lodge Moor, Sheffield

Lodge Moor ‘Old Boys’

Star and Garter Home, Richmond, Surrey

Miners’ Rehabilitation Centre, Uddington, Lanarksire, Scotland

Spinal Injuries Unit, EdenhallHospital, Musselburgh, Midlothian, Scotland

Thistle Foundation, Edinburgh, Scotland

Ministry of Health Spinal Injuries Unit, Rookwood, Cardiff, Wales

This year saw the introduction of shot putting to the programme for the first time, which proved very popular drawing 49 entries. As with the javelin it was split into two classes to ensure fair competition.

Sports:     Archery          Dartchery        Javelin             Shot Putt         Snooker

Swimming      Table Tennis    Wheelchair Basketball      Wheelchair Fencing

Demonstrations:        Club Swinging

For the first time in the history of the Games the weather did not stay fair for the whole of the event. On the Saturday umbrellas were needed as the skies clouded over and the rain set in. It appears the competitors took it their stride and continued to compete where possible. However, some events were delayed, the fencing had to be switched from pitch two to the gymnasium and the final round of the Columbia round of archery had to be cancelled, so only 48 arrows were shot2.

The World Veteran’s Federation, who had helped to finance the Games since 1952 by assisting in the travel costs of athletes coming from abroad, finally had to bring their financial involvement to an end in order to concentrate upon their commitments and projects in other fields of rehabilitation4. This was, therefore, the last year they would be financially involved in the Games having assisted Malta and Greece to send participants to this year’s Games2. In response to this several countries had set up their own sports funds in order to try and make themselves financially independent in the future1.

For the second year running a special stand was erected adjacent to pitch one that allowed twice as many spectators to watch the events there in comfort. This was paid for by the Paraplegic Sports Endowment Fund, who also paid for the dismantling of two old cycle sheds next to the sports ground entrance. This allowed Mr Davies, the Unit’s engineer, and his staff to erect a new archway entrance to the sports arena2.

Prize Winners

Archery (161 entries)

Windsor Round

1. Stoke Mandeville Old Boys A  2653pts 

(R. Jennings, A. Potter, A. Aldwinkle, D. Cathcart)

2. Duchess of Gloucester House  2325pts  

(R. Martin, J. Ross, M. Sheedy, O. Clarke)

Highest Individual Score: Roy Jennings (Stoke Mandeville Old Boy)   692 pts

Best Gold of the Day: Lionel Vick

Best Individual Score by a Stoke Mandeville Old Boy or Old Girl:

Roy Jennings 692 pts

Best Individual Score amongst the Stoke Mandeville Team:

Allan Windle 585 pts

Best Individual Score amongst the Duchess of Gloucester House Team:

R. Martin 653pts

Columbia Round*

1. Belgium A 1101pts  

(H. Puymbroeck, C. Lintermans, R. Mertens, C. Janssens)

2. France A    1092pts  

(Payen, Thomas, Derre, Thiaudiere)

Best Individual Score:

C. Janssens & H. Puymbroeck (Both Belgium A)   316pts

Highest  Individual Score by an Overseas Visitor:

C. Janssens & H. Puymbroeck (Both Belgium A) 316pts

Best Individual Ladies Score:

1. Kathleen Yates (Stoke Mandeville) 287 pts

2. Pamela Cross (Stoke Mandeville Old Girl) 272 pts

Best Gold of the Day: Witold Ruszke (Penley) and Sjoberg (Sweden)

*Final round not shot due to bad weather, therefore, scores are for only 48 arrows

Junior Replica Cup

1. John Flack (Stoke Mandeville)         2. Paul Waddingham (Stoke Mandeville)

Basketball (95 participants)

Despite the changes that took place in the basketball competition the previous year the differences in the conditions and rules under which the game was played in America and at Stoke Mandeville led to some often turbulent play in the incomplete lesion final. Having beaten Argentina 36-0 in the first round and the Duchess of Gloucester House team 34-2 in the next round, the Americans found themselves lined up against the Dutch in the final5. Apparently, the first half of this match was tough, but just about tolerable. However, in the second half the referees had to constantly intervene due to the roughness of play. With the Americans leading 10-4 the match came to a sudden stop due to the withdrawal of Dutch team by the Dutch manager, Mr G. Tromp6, apparently in fear that his players might get seriously injured. After an official enquiry Dr Guttmann regretfully decided to disqualify the American team and according to the Stoke Mandeville version of events this decision was ‘taken in the proper spirit of the Stoke Mandeville Games2’. This version of events is, however, somewhat contradicted by the report appearing in Paraplegia News, which infers that the Americans were cheated out of the match5. In contrast the complete lesion final between the Dutch and Lyme Green in which the Dutch narrowly won 22-20 was described thus ‘never has there been witnesseda finer game of basketball at Stoke, between two teams so evenly matched2’.

Incomplete Lesions

1. Netherlands (Ommen, Meinema, Janssen, Simons, Kruidenier)

USA disqualified

Complete Lesions

1. Netherlands (Van Ommen, Hoogendoorn, Britswater, Zwarts, Deman)   22

2. Lyme Green (Swindlehurst, Moran, Foster, Cale, Platten)                             20

Dartchery (52 entries)

1. Duchess of Gloucester House (R. Martin, M. Sheedy, J. Ross, O. Clarke)

2. Newcastle (Basset, Davidson, Marsden, Ridley)

Fencing (12 entries)

Winning Team

1. Australia (Frank Ponta, Bill Mather-Brown)

2. Rookwood (Dudley Winters, G. Cockeram)

Individual Sabre

1. V. Ludlow (Stoke Mandeville)

2. Dudley Winters (Rookwood)

Individual Ladies Foil

1. Julia Brockwell (Stoke Mandeville)

2. Diana Gubbins (Stoke Mandeville)

Javelin Throw (68 entries)

Class A

1. Hexham (D. Thompson, B. Kamara)

2. USA (Percy Mabee, J. Evensen)

Best Individual Throw: D. Thompson (Hexham) 67ft 10ins

Class B

1. USA (P. Acca, J. Mucci)

2. Lodge Moor (C. Thomas, Russ Scott)

Best Individual Throw: P. Acca (USA) 65ft 6ins

Best Individual Throw of the Day:  D. Thompson (Hexham) 67ft 10ins

Lotte Freeman Cup for the most handicapped competitor: Alan Peckham (South Africa)

Shot Putt (49 entries)

Class A

1. USA (Percy Mabee (19ft 6.5ins), G. Contes (16ft 10ins))

2. Hexham (D. Thompson (20ft 10.75ins), B. Kamara (10ft 11ins))

Best Individual Throw: D. Kihli (Finland) 22ft 10ins

Class B

1. USA (Percy Mabee, B. Jiacoppo)

2. Lodge Moor (C. Thomas, Russ Scott)

Best Individual Throw: B. Jiacoppo (USA)  25ft 2.5ins

Best Individual Throw of the Day:  B. Jiacoppo (USA)  25ft 2.5ins

Snooker (23 entries)

1. Arthur Poulter (Stoke Mandeville)

2. F. Bishton (Lodge Moor Old Boys)

Swimming (84 entries)

Junior Challenge Cup

Boys: 1. E. Hansen (Norway) 2. Roy King (High Wycombe)

Girls: 1. Antoinette Newell (High Wycombe) 2. Gillian Lewis (High Wycombe)

Karl Freeman Cup for the Best Australian Competitor: Bill Mather-Brown.

Winning Team on Points:        1. Austria        2. Germany

Table Tennis (100 entries)

Singles

Class A: 1. Tommy Taylor (Stoke Mandeville)          2. A.G. Smith (Rookwood)

Class B: 1. D. Phillips (Rookwood)                                   2. H. Geluk (Netherlands)

Class C: 1. W. Telsnig (Austria)                                         2. D. Phillips (Rookwood)

Doubles

Class A:         1. Taylor & Heale (Stoke Mandeville)       

                         2.  Joan Adcock & M. Sherwin

Class B:         1. Basile & Contes (USA)                  

                         2. Vann & McCranor (Stoke Mandeville)

Class C:         1. Murrell & Swindlehurst (Lyme Green)  

                         2.  Telsnig & Waldenegg (Austria)

For the first time since the Games began a trophy, donated by The International Society for the Care of Cripples, was presented to the team with the highest number of points based upon the results of all of the sports7. The very first winners of this trophy were the Americans, scoring just over fifty points.

The International Society for the Care of Cripples Challenge Cup for the Best Team competing at ‘The Games’

1. USA  50.25pts

2. Stoke Mandeville 42.5pts

3. Rookwood 34pts

4. Netherlands 29.5pts

5. Stoke Mandeville Old Boys 29pts

Youngest Competitor of the Day: Richard Thompson (Stoke Mandeville) in Swimming (aged 9 years)

Guests of Honour

The Guests of Honour at this year’s Games were the Duchess of Gloucester, who officially opened the Games on the on the Friday; Sir Arthur Porritt, who took the salute during the wheel-past of nations and Miss Gillian Sheen, Olympic Gold Medallist in Fencing, who presented the prizes3. Dr George Bedbrooke of Australia was due to give the closing address on behalf of visiting teams from abroad, but was delayed en route and so the speech was given by the captain of the Australian team, Bill ‘Slim’ O’Connell2.

Following a meeting of experts in the field of sport and the disabled convened by the World Veteran’s Federation in Paris in May 1957 it was decided a technical meeting of experts should be convened to try and unify the rules of the various sports into one international set of rules for each sport that could be agreed and adhered to by all. The need for this had been further strengthened by the events that occurred during the incomplete lesion basketball final. Therefore, at 10.15am on the Sunday morning after the Games closed a lengthy meeting took place in the Examination room with around forty people in attendance. The main resolutions arising from this meeting were as follows:

  1. A tribunal of three members, elected by ballot, be appointed each year to consider and give a decision in any dispute that may arise, should the teams concerned not accept the referee’s decision.
  2. In addition, a member of the Stoke Mandeville organising staff act on the tribunal in an advisory capacity.
  3. Stoke Mandeville continue to set up rules for future Games as close as possible to international rules in all games.
  4. In order to encourage archery as a sport for paraplegics there should be a beginner’s round in archery and that each team be limited to one beginner.
  5. The distances in the swimming competitions be as follows: Class A – 20 metres, Class B and C – 40 metres.
  6. Club throwing be introduced as a new sport in the 1958 Games
  7. Referees be drawn from any country taking part2.

One other major decision came about as a result of the huge growth in the Games and the strain they were placing both upon accommodation and other hospital services. It was decided that a national games would be held in May each year where all of the various British organisations, Spinal Units and individuals would be invited to take part. From these Games a team of the best sportsmen and women would be selected to form a Great Britain national team to participate in the international games. The impact of this change would be two-fold; it would lessen the burden upon the accommodation and other hospital services at the international games by reducing numbers and it would also allow a British team compete on an equal basis with other nations for the first time. The first national games would take place the following year2.

 Sources

1. Paraplegic Sports Endowment Fund, 1957, Second Annual Report and Abstract of Accounts 1956-1957 (IWAS Archives)

2. Scruton, J., 1957, The 1957 International Stoke Mandeville Games, in The Cord, Vol. 9(4); p. 7-28.

3. Programme for the 1957 Stoke Mandeville Games dated 26th-27th July, 1957 (IWAS Archives)

4. The Cord, 1957, Stoke Mandeville Calling with a Pre-view of the 1957 Stoke Mandeville Games, Vol. 9(3); p. 9-12.

5. Paraplegia News, 1957, Champions –Yet Not, September; p. 16.

6. Bucks Herald, 1957, “Wheelchair Olympics” at Stoke Mandeville, , Friday 2nd August; p. 5.

7. Bucks Advertiser & Aylesbury News, 1957, A Friendly Spirit Shone In The Wheelchair Games, Friday 2nd August; p. 11.

Olympic Recognition: The Award of the Sir Thomas Fearnley Cup.

Sir Thomas Fearnley (1880-1950) was an IOC member for Norway from 1927 until 1948 and an honorary member from 1948 until his death in 1950. He was also President of the Norwegian Federation of Ship Owners. Just before his death he decided to offer a cup in his name, to become known as the Fearnley Cup, which was awarded annually by the IOC between 1950 and 1974 to a sports club for its outstanding merit in the name of Olympism1. The original cup remains at Campagne de Mon-Repos in Lausanne, Switzerland, with the recipient receiving a miniature copy and a diploma2.

At the Stoke Mandeville Games of 1956 some of the prizes were presented by Sir (later Lord) Arthur Porritt3, himself a surgeon and also an IOC member for Great Britain. At the Games he is reported as stating that ‘The spirit of these Games goes beyond the Olympic Games spirit. You compete not only with skill and endurance but with courage and bravery too.4’ In fact the Games so impressed him that a few weeks later he wrote to Otto Mayer, Chancellor of the IOC, nominating the Games for the Fearnley Cup5. He also assured Herr Mayer that he was certain that the nomination would be backed by Lord Burghley, Great Britain’s other IOC member at the time, who had also presented prizes at the Stoke Mandeville Games of 1954. Otto Mayer replied less than a week later stating that he was uncertain about the eligibility of the Games as the cup was awarded for “meritorious achievement in the service of the Olympic Movement”6. However, he put the nomination forward anyway and at their session held in conjunction with the Olympic Games in Melbourne two months later the members voted to award the Fearnley Cup to the Games. This was the first time the cup had ever been awarded to a British organisation or any kind of disability sport organisation anywhere.

The replica cup and diploma were presented to Dr Guttmann by Sir Arthur Porritt in a special ceremony held on 30th January, 1957 at the British Olympic Association headquarters in London7. Also present at the ceremony were the Secretary and the Appeals Secretary of the British Olympic Association along with Dr Guttmann’s organising team for the Stoke Mandeville Games – Miss Dora Bell, Miss Joan Scruton, Mr Charlie Atkinson and Mr Thomas ‘Q’ Hill.

The award of the Fearnley Cup motivated Dr Guttmann to dream of far bigger things as is shown in the report of his opening speech at the 1957 Games when, with reference to the Fearnley Cup he is reported to have stated “I hope this is only the beginning of a closer connection between the Stoke Mandeville Games and the Olympic Games. In the past few years I have always emphasised that the Stoke Mandeville Games have become the equivalent of the Olympic Games.” He apparently went on to say that after the splendid recognition by the Olympic Committee in awarding them the Fearnley Cup he hoped that the Olympic Games would soon be open to disabled sportsmen and women8.

Sources

1. LA84 Foundation website, 2009, Norway and Olympism, (http://www.la84foundation.org/OlympicInformationCenter/OlympicReview/1978/ore123/ore123k.pdf) accessed 24-10-09.

2. Online Olympic Games Museum, 2009, The Sir Thomas Fearnley Cup, (http://olympic-museum.de/awards/fearnley_cup.htm) accessed 24-10-09.

3. Lord Porritt went on to spend more than thirty years as Chairman of the Paraplegic Sports Endowment Fund, which was set up to help finance the running costs of the Games.

4. The Bucks Herald, Friday, August 3rd, 1956, p. 9.

5. Letter dated 27th August, 1956 from Sir Arthur Porritt to Otto Mayer, Chancellor of the International Olympic Committee nominating the Stoke Mandeville Games for the Fearnley Cup. (IOC Archives)

6. Letter dated September 3rd, 1956 from Otto Mayer, Chancellor of the International Olympic Committee to Sir Arthur Porritt in response to the nomination of the Stoke Mandeville Games for the Fearnley Cup. (IOC Archives)

7. The Cord, 1957, The Fearnley Cup, Vol.9(2), p.9.

8. The Bucks Herald, Friday, August 2nd, 1957, p. 5.

The British Paraplegic Sports Endowment Fund

Slowly, but surely, the Stoke Mandeville Games were becoming a victim of their own success. In the four years since the Games had become truly international in nature in 1952 they had grown from 130 participants from two nations to 280 participants from 18 nations. The increasing cost of putting the Games on combined with the problems of housing all the athletes and officials led to the announcement by Dr Guttmann at the Games of 1955 that the future of the Games was in danger. This was partly due to the fact the small local Paraplegic Sports Fund had become insufficient to meet the rising costs of putting on the Games and this was exacerbated by the fact that the World Veteran’s Federation had announced that they would be unable to continue the generous financial assistance they had previously given to help get the Games established. In addition, the Games had previously used vacant hospital wards to host visiting participants, but these were rapidly filling up with patients and so were unlikely to be available for future Games making accommodation a key issue.

The announcement by Dr Guttmann at the Games of 1955 that the future of the Games was in danger caused Mr J.C.A. Faure, a spectator at those Games and father of one of the physiotherapists at Stoke Mandeville, to approach Dr Guttmann in order to see what could be done to rectify the situation. Mr Faure, a successful businessman with Unilever and also President of the Principal Oil Seed, Oils and Fats Trade Association, had discussions with Dr Guttmann as to the best way forward and on 15th November 1955 a group of interested individuals gathered at Stoke Mandeville with a view to setting up a Paraplegics Sports Endowment Fund in order to put the future of the Games on a firm financial footing. In order to do this it was decided that a sum of not less than £60,000 would be required. As Dr Guttmann had previously done in inviting politicians and celebrities to distribute prizes at the Games, the first thing that was done to try and gain the confidence and support of the public for the new fund was to attract well-known personalities to associate themselves with the aims of the fund. As can be seen from the list below that list read like a page from Debrett’s or Who’s who?

Patron

The Marquess of Carisbrooke

Vice-Patrons

Earl and Countess Mountbatten of Burma

Field Marshall Sir and Lady Gerald W.R. Templer

Air Chief Marshall Sir and Lady Dermot A. Boyle

President

Sir Arthur E. Porritt

Vice Presidents

Rt Hon Lord Cohen of Birkenhead

Rt Hon Lord Webb-Johnson

Sir Geoffrey Jefferson

Sir Selwyn Selwyn-Clarke

Sir Reginald Watson-Jones

Right Reverend Lord Bishop of London

Viscount Leverhulme

W.J. Everard

Niels Max Jensen

Ralph Tadman

A management board was set up with Mr Faure as its Chairman, Dr Guttmann as the Vice-Chairman with the other members being co-opted from the now defunct Paraplegic Sports Fund, whose remaining funds were transferred to the newly titled British Paraplegic Sports Endowment Fund. The appeal was launched in March 1956 with an open letter published in The Times newspaper and signed by many of the eminent individuals named above. The Marquess of Carisbrooke also wrote directly to many large industrial and commercial organisations. The result of this appeal was that a total of £13,114 was raised by the end of September that year. By the end of September 1959 the appeal had raised £40,954.

However, in order to ensure the Games of 1956 could take place it was decided that it would be necessary to build a further two accommodation huts in addition to the two completed for the 1955 Games. It was estimated that this would cost approximately £6,000 and without knowing whether the appeal would be successful or not, Mr Faure and his business associates guaranteed the whole £6,000 in order that building work could begin immediately.

The Fund itself and the money it generated were used in a variety of ways. These include:

  1. New accommodation huts
  2. Erection of temporary stands for spectators
  3. Running costs of the Games themselves
  4. Purchase of sports equipment for paraplegics who had left hospital and were now living at home
  5. Financing paraplegic teams and individuals to take part in sports events at home and abroad
  6. Grants to The Cord, the journal for paraplegics

Sources

Paraplegic Sports Endowment Fund, 1956, First Annual Report and Abstract of Accounts 1955-1956 (IWAS Archives)